School of GeoSciences

School of GeoSciences


Martin Hurst

Tectonic Geomorphology


Latest News

(last updated 23/08/2013)

11/12/2013 Paper Alert! "Controls on the magnitude-frequency scaling of an inventory of secular landslides" published in Earth Surface Dynamics. Available online here.

23/08/2013 Paper Alert! "Hillslopes record the growth and decay of landscapes" published in Science. Available online here.

01/07/2013 Graduated! I'm finally, officially, a doctor!

28/06/2013 Paper Alert! "Controls on the magnitude-frequency scaling of an inventory of secular landslides" published as a discussion in the new open access journal Earth Surface Dynamics Discussions (EsurfD). Available online here.

21/02/2013 Paper Alert! "Influence of lithology on hillslope morphology and response to tectonic forcing in the northern Sierra Nevada of California" accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface. Available online here.

20/12/12 Thesis accepted pending minor corrections.

2/7/12 Martin is now based at the British Geological Survey and can be contacted using mhurst@bgs.ac.uk.

26/6/12 Thesis Submitted!

15/5/12 Martin will be moving to the British Geological Survey in July 2012 to take up a position as a Quantitative Geomorphologist.

1/5/12 Paper alert! "Using hilltop curvature to derive the spatial distribution of erosion rates" now published in Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface. Available online here.


Background and Research

I graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 2008 with a degree in Geology and Physical Geogrpaphy and went on to complete a PhD in 2012 under the supervision of Dr. Simon Mudd, also in Edinburgh. I am now a geomorphologist working for the British Geological Survey in Keyworth, Nottingham.

My research interests are centred around fluvial geomorphology, hillslope processes and landscape evolution. During my Ph.D. I developed novel techniques for interogating hillslope morphology to interpret the rates and style of landscape evolution, particularly in transient settings. Rivers that are incising leave little evidence behind that can help geomorphologists understand their history of downcutting, but where hillslopes can keep up, they record a history of baselevel lowering in adjacent rivers. The properties of the adjacent hillslope (topographic shape, soil thickness, soil production rates, soil transport rates) are a function of the rate of incision of the river.

Having moved to the British Geological Survey in summer 2012, I am now tackling a broad selection of topics in geomorphology, including quantifying rates of cliff retreat along rocky coasts, modelling coastal evolution, developing and applying models of environmental change, and exploring the history of landslide occurence in the UK.

[MDH India] [MDH Graduate] [Alps]

More About Me

Aside from research I am a keen sports fan, regularly attending football matches at the City Ground and occaisionally Easter Road. I play golf at Ruddington Grange Golf Club.